Welcome Sunny Verghese – new Chair of the World Business Council for Sustainable Development

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Statement

Statement by Andrew Petersen, Chief Executive of Sustainable Business Australia, Australia’s peak organisation for businesses engaging in sustainable development and aligning with the Sustainable Development Goals. 

The arrival of Mr Sunny Verghese to the role of Chairman of the World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD) is another positive sign of the broadening of the sustainable development business agenda beyond the Europe, the Americas and Australia.

Asia is the epicentre of critical issues and urgent policy actions when it comes to sustainable development. Hundreds of millions of people in Asia face increased poverty and danger through climate change, disease and exploitation and through unsustainable development, unmanaged population growth and inaction on climate change. Governments and business in Asia have a compelling responsibility to act and mitigate negatives and take advantage of a more sustainable future. Asia has the most to lose and the most to gain.

Often, these counties are the start of a global supply chain for western companies or a key link in it. They are uniquely placed. Further, many of countries are developing their energy systems, modernising their agriculture and are in the midst of developing public policy for sustainable development. They’re not hamstrung as many western nations are on fossil fuel based energy technology and policy development on sustainable development and climate change that are in the slow lane. They know the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals are central to their success as societies and often push more developed countries into action, as we saw in Paris at the end of 2015.

This is why it is great that a Singapore based Indian national, Sunny Verghese, is in the chair at the WBCSD, replacing the sustainable development icon, Paul Polman, of Unilever. Paul was a true leader in every sense of the word. With Sunny, we have someone who brings unique leadership through experience of operating a global agri-business.

In addition to being the first Chair from the agri-sector, Mr Verghese is also the first Asia-based and Asian CEO to be elected to this position.

Sunny is a good friend of Australia and his business, Olam, is very active here. Agriculture is undergoing a rapid shift to more sustainable practises and agri-business is way ahead of government when it comes to adapting to and mitigating against climate change. Sunny’s company has been at the forefront of that innovation. With the global population expected to grow by over three billion by the turn of the century, the need for more sustainable agriculture and water resource management on lands rapidly changing and often deteriorating due to climate change is critical.

Sunny told the ABC in 2014:

I think Australia will be a major catalyst for agricultural innovation and growth. Australia, however, should continue to find the next practice. I always say that trying to be best practice is lousy strategy because the whole world wants to be best practice. Everybody is trying to be best practice. So, everybody’s achieving best practice, which means you’re all middle of the pack. What does distinguish Australia is that it has always invented next practice in agriculture. But in order to stay at the forefront, it needs to invest in research, continue to invest in research, to find that next practice, the next breakthrough, which becomes the global standard for everybody else to aspire for. In many commodities, Australia really sets that tone. But it cannot rest on its laurels – it has to continue to work hard to retain that edge. 

 We look forward to welcoming Sunny back to Australia, hopefully sometime this year, to talk with Australian business about his agenda for complex and interlinked issues in energy, food and land use, and cities and mobility, in line with the Sustainable Development Goals.


Resources

About Sunny and Olam

Sunny co-founded Olam in 1989 and leads the Company’s strategy, planning, business development and management. His external Directorships include Chairman of International Enterprise Singapore and the Human Capital Leadership Institute. Sunny is a recipient of the Outstanding CEO of the Year award, as well as the Public Service Medal from the Government of Singapore.

Olam is a leading agri-business operating from seed to shelf in 70 countries, supplying food and industrial raw materials to over 23,000 customers worldwide. Established in 1989, today we have built a global leadership position in many of our businesses such as Edible Nuts, Cocoa, Spices and Vegetable Ingredients, Coffee, Cotton and Rice.

Olam has a well-established presence in Australia, with a particularly strong footprint in the Eastern states of Queensland, New South Wales and Victoria. We operate an integrated supply chain for 5 key products: cotton, almonds, pulses, cocoa and dairy, delivering these to over 500 customers worldwide. Olam employs over 400 permanent staff and approximately 300 seasonal employees during peak seasons. Our head office is located in Brisbane (Queensland) with regional offices located within Queensland, New South Wales and Victoria.

Olam biographies

Sunny in Australia

WBCSD

News Release


Updated: 11 January 2018

 

sustainAUS, Q4 2017, News and views from SBA, its global network and members.

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Focus – COP23

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The Paris spirit is still alive and kicking. Just over two years ago, we were celebrating the culmination of years of work in Paris, with the adoption of a historic climate agreement. Not only does the Paris Agreement see all countries taking action to combat climate change, it also recognises the important role of non-state actors (business, cities, civil society) in driving climate action and, specifically, of the private sector in mobilising much-needed climate finance.

COP23 was held in Bonn, Germany this year, and was generally regarded as a success but the UN issued a warning to countries that they significantly need to ‘up their game’ in terms of commitments to emissions reduction and carbon reduction ahead on next year’s conference in Bonn. Over the coming months, there needs to be signs given that the different elements of the Paris Agreement and its rules are being joined up by policymakers, so business can make long-term decisions with some clarity on the framework.

SBA CEO Andrew Petersen wraps up this year’s COP in this podcast with a look at what happened and the implications for business and the sustainable development agenda.

The World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD) said the key takeaway from this round of negotiations is that companies are now formally invited to provide input into the climate negotiations through reports, dialogue and analyses. WBCSD member companies look forward to actively engaging in this process through regional, solutions-focused multi-stakeholder meetings over the course of 2018 and through to COP24.

The United Nations Environment Program (UNEP) issued an ominous warning at the start of COP23 saying that while political, industrial and civil leaders are strengthening and implementing the Paris Agreement on Climate Change, the current state pledges cover no more than a third of the emission reductions needed, creating a dangerous gap, which even growing momentum from non-state actors cannot close. A report from UNEP highlighted the dangers of that gap, the issues behind it and the means at the world’s disposal to close it.


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2017 Review of Climate Change Polices, we ask: “Where’s the policy to spur ambition?

The Australian Government has released its 2017 Review of Climate Change Policies. We believe it is another missed opportunity, with little ambition for an enabling framework that emphasises sustainable, responsible and climate-smart development for Australia.

The report crystallises the weaknesses of the existing policy approach as we continue to mark time on climate action in Australia. The final page of the report, contains a recommendation that Australia get “a long-term climate change strategy”. In essence, one the biggest initiatives to come from the review of policies is to develop another strategy, starting next year and being completed by 2020. SBA will engage with Australia’s policymakers on this climate strategy, just as it has done for the last 27 years.

The key thing business in Australia has been calling out for is a long-term energy and climate policy that ensures certainty and yet here we are, again, being told there will be another strategy due in three years from now.

You can read our complete statement and download our submission at our website.


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Leadership in Action

GlobeScan recently hosted a seminar on results from the latest edition of the GlobeScan/SustainAbility Survey, which focused on climate change and progress made on the Paris Agreement. GSS is one the longest-running expert surveys on sustainability-related topics of its kind. In our latest report, it analyzes viewpoints of about 400 global sustainability experts on a range of questions. You can watch the Asia Pacific webinar and slide deck here.


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Climate disclosure gaining momentum across Australia, but more needs to be done.

The 12th of December 2017 marked the two year anniversary of the Paris Agreement, the global convention – now signed by 197 countries – to mitigate climate change and adapt to its effects. n the run up to this significant event, CDP, in collaboration with Sustainable Business Australia, hosted the Australian Climate, Water and Forests Leadership Forum in November.  Taking place in Sydney, the forum marked the release of CDP´s Australia and New Zealand Report 2017 and celebrated environmental leadership in the region. You can read the key findings on our web site.


 

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NSW ‘Draft future transport strategy 2056’

The Draft Future Transport 2056 Strategy is a vision for how transport can support growth and the economy of New South Wales over the next 40 years. The final strategy will be released in “early 2018”.

SBA submitted that future mobility coupled with an effective mass transit system has the potential to improve the lives and livelihoods of people across NSW – their quality of life, their health, their environment. Autonomous vehicles (AVs), electric vehicles (EVs) and shared mobility models can reduce emissions, and other airborne particulates, remove cars and/or journeys from the road, significantly improve safety and accessibility, especially for those in areas poorly served by mass transit and people with limited existing accessibility such as the elderly and disabled.

However, undirected, future mobility may also exacerbate existing social and environmental impacts. A mobility system dominated by private autonomous travel could increase journeys and vehicles on the road. Private autonomous vehicles could subsume public transport routes, increasing mobility inequality. Without widespread adoption of EVs, emissions will increase.

You can read our full submission on our web site.


Member news

Energetics: Insights on how the energy landscape shifted in the wake of the announcement of the National Energy Guarantee which seeks to address reliability and achieve emissions reductions.  With implications for energy procurement strategies, market engagement and climate change response, Energetics’ energy markets and policy experts examine the emerging issues.

Jacobs: Jacobs has picked up the Sustainable Projects Award from the Australian Institute of Project Management (AIPM) for its work on the remediation of Cox Peninsula in the Northern Territory. Jacobs was appointed as the independent Project Manager to oversee the remediation works and to ensure minimal impacts to the land and surrounding communities.

Jacobs: Jacobs has an exciting opportunity for an experienced and driven person to lead the Enavironmentally Sustainable Design (ESD) team in the Southern region. The role exists in the Built Environment team in the Melbourne office.

Jacobs: Jacobs and the National Rugby League (NRL) have joined forces to promote Indigenous youth employment in Australia. The two have signed a Memorandum of Understanding to provide greater employment opportunities for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (ATSI) youth across Australia.

NAB
: “NAB boss named 2017 Shared Value Champion. Dr Ken Henry AC, Chair, National Australia Bank, has been named the 2017 Shared Value Champion at the 2017 Shared Value Awards ceremony held in Sydney on Tuesday evening while Bendigo and Adelaide Bank were named as the winning corporate organisation leading through shared value”. (Third Sector)

NAB: National Australia Bank says it will halt all lending for new thermal coal mining projects, becoming the first major Australian bank to phase out support of thermal coal mining.

NRMA: The NRMA has announced that it will establish Australia’s largest electric vehicle fast-charging network, suitable for a range of electric vehicles and free for NRMA Members. More than 95 per cent of NRMA Member road trips will be covered by the network. The $10 million investment will deliver at least 40 chargers, more than double the size of the current network of chargers in NSW and the ACT.

NRMA: More than fifty Federal and state laws will need to be amended and the nation’s motoring insurance and traffic fine network overhauled to prepare Australia for autonomous vehicles, according a report by NRMA, PricewaterhouseCoopers and Keolis Downer.


Events

Q1
World Economic Forum – Annual Meeting, 23-26 January, Davos
UN – Investor Summit on Climate Risk, 31 January, New York

Q2 
SBA & GPSC – International Stewardship Forum – 4 – 6 April, Sydney
SBA – April – Fiona Wain Oration 2018
WBCSD – Liaison Delegate Meeting, 16 – 19 April, Montreux
World Bank / IMF Spring Meetings, 20-22 April, Washington D.C.
UN Global Compact – Making Global Goals Local Business, May, , Buenos Aires
UNFCCC – May – COP Session–continuation of the Talanoa Dialogue
SBA and partners – May / June – Green Glow Conference w/ Banksia, EU Delegation, WWF

Q3 
UN – High-Level Political Forum & SDG Business Forum 9-20 July, New York
Global Climate Action Summit 12-14 September, San Francisco
PRI in Person, 12-14 September, San Francisco
UN – General Assembly Week, Week of 18 September, New York
UN – Private Sector Forum & UN Global Compact Leaders Summit, Week of 18 September, New York

Q4 
• WBCSD – Council Meeting, 22 – 25 October, Singapore
• UNFCCC – COP24/CMP14, 3-14 December, Katowice, Poland


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One more thing….

Like you, we’re having a break. The office closes at the middle of the day on Friday 22 December 2017 and we will be back on Monday 8 January 2018.

From all at SBA, we wish you, your family and colleagues a safe and happy festive period and very much look forward to working with you in 2018.


Updated: 22 December 2017

 

News Release: 2017 Review of Climate Change Policies. Where’s the policy to spur ambition?

 

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News Release

2017 Review of Climate Change Policies. Where’s the policy to spur ambition?

Statement by Andrew Petersen, Chief Executive of Sustainable Business Australia, Australia’s peak organisation for businesses engaging in sustainable development and aligning with the Sustainable Development Goals. 

The Australian Government today released its 2017 Review of Climate Change Policies. Overall, it is another missed opportunity, with little ambition for an enabling framework that emphasises sustainable, responsible and climate-smart development for Australia.

The report crystallises the weaknesses of the existing policy approach as we continue to mark time on climate action in Australia. The final page of the report (page 43), contains a recommendation that Australia get “a long-term climate change strategy”. In essence, one the biggest initiatives to come from the review of policies is to develop another strategy, starting next year and being completed by 2020. SBA will engage with Australia’s policymakers on this climate strategy, just as it has done for the last 27 years.

The key thing business in Australia has been calling out for is a long-term energy and climate policy that ensures certainty and yet here we are, again, being told there will be another strategy due in three years from now. The Paris Climate Agreement was signed in 2015; the Sustainable Development Goals came into effect in 2016; the Finkel Review was handed down this year and the UN just said at COP23 in Bonn that “current state pledges cover no more than a third of the emission reductions needed” (UNEP). It is beyond belief that Australia doesn’t have all of the information it needs now to deliver a strategy today, for tomorrow.

The review offers no overall and coordinated roadmap to make Australia net carbon neutral by mid-century. The review doesn’t do anything to make Australia a clean renewable energy super-power. There are no incentives for business to accelerate and scale up the innovative technological approaches, approaches like the WBCSD’s Low Carbon Technology Partnerships initiative. There’s no requirement on business to act on climate by disclosing risk, as urged by APRA. The review doesn’t talk of a policy response to the impact of climate change on national security, health, natural disasters, food or water supply. There’s no mention of the Sustainable Development Goals. There’s little talk of carbon farming and battery storage. There’s no talk of the impact on one of our biggest export industries, tourism, and the Great Barrier Reef gets only a passing mention, which is more than endangered species and land clearing got only a cursory glance. There’s no discussion about supporting industries, regions and people currently involved in fossil fuel extraction transition to a new future. The review states what is already known by governments, business and community alike.

The Government’s response indicates that it sees climate change policy solely through an energy lens. It doesn’t see climate change as the massive threat that it is to Australia’s economy, national security and the well-being of its citizens that most do. The Government needs to recognise the sovereign climate risk and broaden its view and build a policy that is fit for future purpose.

Forward thinking business have been calling for greater ambition, robustness and longer-term thinking, in Australia and internationally. While the overview view is disappointing there are some ‘green shoots’. We welcome the ability of business to purchase verifiable credible internationally recognised credits to acquit carbon liability. Signals that carbon pricing is being seriously considered are welcome as well, particularly as the recent climate negotiations at COP23 saw much support for carbon pricing approaches promoting its use in limiting emissions within different jurisdictions.

In contrast, New Zealand is getting on with the job. The new government there this week announced the Zero Carbon Act, describing it as “a cornerstone of New Zealand’s transition to a low emission, climate resilient future”. It will also establish an independent Climate Change Commission, similar to the one abolished by the current Australian government in 2013.

We would have liked to see action start today, not in 2020. We need climate and energy policy that is integrated into the FY2018/19 budgetary process so that climate risk is finally factored into all of Australia’s major economic decisions.

We encourage the Government to immediately develop a low carbon plan and vision for Australia to enable business to have confidence to scale up and accelerate their enterprise, innovation and investment in Australia’s low carbon economy.


Resources


Updated: 19 December 2017

 

Submission: NSW ‘Draft future transport strategy 2056’

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Background

The Draft Future Transport 2056 Strategy is a vision for how transport can support growth and the economy of New South Wales over the next 40 years. This strategy is underpinned by the Draft Regional Services and Infrastructure Plan and the Draft Greater Sydney Services and Infrastructure Plan as well as a number of supporting plans including Road Safety and Tourism. The consultation period for the Draft Future Transport 2056 Strategy is now closed. The final strategy will be released in “early 2018”. (TfNSW)


SBA commentary (Excerpts)

Future mobility coupled with an effective mass transit system has the potential to improve the lives and livelihoods of people across NSW – their quality of life, their health, their environment. Autonomous vehicles (AVs), electric vehicles (EVs) and shared mobility models can reduce emissions, and other airborne particulates, remove cars and/or journeys from the road, significantly improve safety and accessibility, especially for those in areas poorly served by mass transit and people with limited existing accessibility such as the elderly and disabled.

However, undirected, future mobility may also exacerbate existing social and environmental impacts. A mobility system dominated by private autonomous travel could increase journeys and vehicles on the road. Private autonomous vehicles could subsume public transport routes, increasing mobility inequality. Without widespread adoption of EVs, emissions will increase.

Sustainable Business Australia (SBA) fully supports development of the FTS 2056. We applaud FTS 2056 for its strong sustainability focus throughout. We acknowledge and support the draft strategy highlighting the importance of ‘a sustainable society’ and of minimising the environmental costs imposed by the transport system. We also support the strategy’s aim to increase the mode share of public transport services and reduce the use of single occupant vehicles, consideration of how active transport can be increased, and focus on delivering flexible, integrated solutions for customers that work across transport modes.

The development of the FTS 2056 provides a significant and timely opportunity to ensure that NSW has a integrated and strategic vision that works across all areas of NSW Government and involves business, enabling future mobility to deliver sustainable outcomes throughout NSW.


SBA recommendations (Excerpts)

Align with the UN Sustainable Development Goals

Transport is critical to a sustainable world and to the achievement of many of the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals, of which Australia is a signatory.

The FTS 2056 should align with the SDGs, and explain how the NSW Government will work towards the goals, including relevant targets and monitoring framework.

Include a business-government working group to ensure the transition to connected, autonomous and electric is sustainable

Business is a uniquely placed co-collaborator in the delivery of a sustainable mobility future. We commend the FTS 2056 commitment to “consulting outside of Government” on future developments and the business engagement methods listed with “working with our customers to solve problems”. We think the strategy should go further and include commitment to establish a working group representing business, consumers and government and tasked with forming a coordinated roadmap to enable the transition to connected, autonomous and electric vehicles to lead to a sustainable mobility future.

Include strategies to incentivise corporate uptake of sustainable future transport

Business owns over half of all registered vehicles on the road and their investment and its influence on  employees and customers can both significantly enhance mass demand and behavioural acceptance for sustainable future mobility modes, EVs and shared transport in the short term and further afield AVs and mobility as a service.

Include a commitment to integrate sustainable mobility into NSW planning legislation

As part of an integrated cross-Government strategy, the FTS 2056 should expressly acknowledge the role of sustainable transport planning measures in delivering sustainable development.  This should include a commitment to establish a robust legislative framework to support sustainable transport for new developments, including specific requirement for the development, monitoring and evaluation of Travel Plans for all new developments of a certain size or impact.


Resources


Updated: 14 December 2017

 

News Release: Climate disclosure gaining momentum across Australia, but more needs to be done

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News Release

Climate disclosure gaining momentum across Australia, but more needs to be done

The 12th of December 2017 marked the two year anniversary of the Paris Agreement, the global convention – now signed by 197 countries – to mitigate climate change and adapt to its effects.

In the run up to this significant event, CDP, in collaboration with Sustainable Business Australia (SBA), hosted the Australian Climate, Water and Forests Leadership Forum in November. Taking place in Sydney, the forum marked the release of CDP´s Australia and New Zealand Report 2017 and celebrated environmental leadership in the region.

“In 2017, more than 200 companies based or listed in Australia were invited to respond to CDP’s environmental information requests, made on behalf of over 800 institutional investor signatories with assets of US$100 trillion. In response, 81 companies disclosed environmental data,” says CDP Asia Pacific Manager, Rosalind Keller-Liang.

Key findings from the regional report include:

  • Two Australian companies are among the 160 companies ranked on CDP´s A List this year (out of more than 2,400 companies worldwide)
  • More companies are mapping out their low-carbon future: 64% of responding companies in the region reported emissions reduction targets this year.
  • Momentum is building towards a low-carbon future: 27% of responding companies in the region are now using an internal price of carbon.
  • Climate is now a board-level topic: 98% of responding companies in the region now have Board- or senior management-level responsibility for climate change.

As the recent statements from Geoff Summerhayes, executive board member of the Australian Prudential Regulation Authority (APRA), attest, the transition to a low-carbon economy is not only ongoing, but fast-moving. His comments encourage Australian businesses to plan ahead, rather than fight against the rising tide,” notes Jeremy Burke, CDP Worldwide Trustee.

“While the regulator has no immediate plans to introduce new standards related to climate risks, Australia’s financial sector should expect more emphasis on disclosure around climate risk exposure and management in the future. For companies, disclosure offers tangible benefits, equipping them to respond to regulatory and policy changes, as well as be identified as corporate leaders in the low-carbon transition,” says Burke.

“Although significant work still needs to be done, the CDP report clearly shows that corporate Australia is taking action on climate-related risks and opportunities, and will continue to be an essential component in the transition to the low-carbon economy,” says Andrew Petersen, CEO, Sustainable Business Australia.

Background

On November 21st, in collaboration with Sustainable Business Australia, CDP hosted the Australian Climate, Water and Forests Leadership Forum in Sydney. The event marked the release of CDP´s 2017 corporate disclosure analysis and results and celebrated environmental leadership in the region.

Through presentations and panel sessions, the current and future role of environmental reporting was discussed in a regional context. Speakers offered insights on scenario analysis related to environmental risks and opportunities, science-based targets, responsible investments, the implications of the Taskforce on Climate-related Financial Disclosures’ (TCFD) recommendations, as well as local government policies and strategies. In addition to corporate, investor, city and NGO representatives, speakers included Professor Kate Auty, the ACT Government’s Commissioner for Sustainability and the Environment, Andrew Petersen, CEO of SBA, and Jeremy Burke, CDP Worldwide Trustee. CDP Asia Pacific Manager, Rosalind Keller-Liang, presented on key findings from CDP’s global and regional analysis and shared updates on CDP’s 2018 questionnaires, which will be sector specific and incorporate the TCFD’s recommendations.

Alongside the Forum, CDP also launched its 2017 regional report for Australia and New Zealand to complement the global climate change analysis that was released in October. In addition to a regional analysis, the report showcases leading companies and their approaches to measuring and managing impacts related to climate change, water security and deforestation.

Key findings from the regional report include:

  • Two Australian companies are among the 160 companies ranked on CDP´s A List this year (out of more 2,400 companies worldwide): Stockland received an A score for the climate change program for the second consecutive year, and Brambles was one of only six companies globally that scored an A for the forests program.
  • More companies in Australia and New Zealand are mapping out their low-carbon future: 64% of responding companies reported emissions reduction targets in 2017. This year, Auckland International Airport became the first company in the region to have a science-based target officially validated by the Science Based Targets Initiative (SBTi), ensuring that its target is in line with the level of decarbonization required to keep global temperature increase below 2 degrees Celsius, the central aim of the Paris Agreement,

Momentum is building towards a low-carbon future:

  • 27% of reporting companies in the region are now using an internal price of carbon, and a further 23% plan to implement this within the next two years.
  • The number of companies in the region reporting renewable energy consumption targets increased more than threefold in the past year, from two in 2016, to nine this year.
  • Climate is now a board-level topic: 98% of reporting companies in Australia and New Zealand now have Board- or senior management-level responsibility for climate change.

About CDP

CDP is an international non-profit that drives companies and governments to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions, safeguard water resources and protect forests. CDP has been driving environmental disclosure globally since 2000, and in Australia since 2006. Voted number one climate research provider by investors and working with institutional investors with assets of US$100 trillion, we leverage investor and buyer power to motivate companies to disclose and manage their environmental impacts. Over 6,300 companies with some 55% of global market capitalization disclosed environmental data through CDP in 2017. This is in addition to the over 500 cities and 100 states and regions who disclosed, making CDP’s platform one of the richest sources of information globally on how companies and governments are driving environmental change. CDP, formerly Carbon Disclosure Project, is a founding member of the We Mean Business Coalition. Please visit http://www.cdp.net or follow us @CDP to find out more.

For any enquiries, please contact CDP on australianz@cdp.net or +852 5547 8389.

About SBA

SBA was established in Australia in 1991, and is the leading body for support and advocacy for sustainable business activities in Australia. In 2014 SBA was appointed Australia’s Global Partner for World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD).

SBA’s members include leading Australian businesses from all sectors, who share a commitment to economic, environmental and social development. SBA represents member companies, public sector enterprises and institutions, BINGOs and community organisations, which in turn represent 100,000+ Australian employees. www.sba.asn.au.


Resources


Updated: 14 December 2017

New video series – Natural Capital

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Introduction

At the World Forum on Natural Capital in Edinburgh, the World Business Council of Sustainable Development (WBCSD) released a short film series, designed to underscore how important it is for companies to value their relationship with nature. The film illustrates what happens when businesses don’t take the sustainability warning seriously. Make sure you don’t get caught short-sighted – check out the film today and explore cutting-edge business examples from nearly 40 member companies who are leading the way in natural capital.


Video


Resources


Updated: 28 November 2017